What Getting A Tooth Crown Is Really Like: Before And After

What Getting A Tooth Crown Is Really Like: Before And After

If you’re concerned about how getting a tooth crown before and after will affect the look and function of your teeth, then the photos below of one patient before and after receiving their tooth crown will help clear up your doubts about the procedure. These days, dental technology has advanced to the point where tooth crowns can be fabricated to match your natural teeth as closely as possible, ensuring that you don’t have to sacrifice looks or quality of life when you need dental work completed. Read on below to see what getting a tooth crown is like!

Why People Get Tooth Crowns

Tooth crowns are a great option for anyone who has lost their tooth due to decay, injury, or other health problems. In the past, people had to live with missing teeth or seek dental implants. However, modern dentistry offers tooth crowns that can be made to fit perfectly with your smile. These crowns are made of porcelain and bonded to your teeth to cover the space where your natural tooth used to be. The procedure takes only one visit; you will have an impression of your mouth taken and lab technicians will create the personalized crown that fits your mouth perfectly.

The Procedure

A crown also called an inlay, is typically made of porcelain or metal and covers the tooth’s chewing surface. The tooth can be restored to its original shape, size, and strength. In some cases, the gum tissue may need to be trimmed to place the crown properly. A temporary restoration may be placed until the permanent crown is ready.

Recovery

The surgery took about an hour, and I woke up with a numb mouth. The first few days following the surgery were difficult because eating was excruciatingly painful, but it gradually improved over a week. On the day after the surgery, I could barely eat anything without crying from how sensitive my gums felt. I would recommend getting some pain relief medication from your dentist before your appointment to help alleviate any discomfort during recovery.

The first few days following my tooth crown installation were difficult because eating was excruciatingly painful, but it gradually improved over a week. On the day after my surgery, I could barely eat anything without crying from how sensitive my gums felt.

Risks And Side Effects

A tooth crown, or cap, is a dental restoration that covers the entire tooth to protect it from damage. It’s also used in cosmetic dentistry to give your smile a more complete look. Tooth crowns are usually made out of porcelain or metal alloy.

A single-to-double tooth crown may be recommended if you have only one functional natural tooth in front, one very large filling, or have lost teeth at an early age. A single-to-single tooth crown may be recommended if you have one functional natural tooth in front and are not grinding your teeth excessively (bruxism).

Tooth pain can occur when food gets stuck in your teeth because it has no protection from the teeth around it.

The Results

When you lose a tooth, it’s important to see your dentist to see if you need any dental work. In my case, I lost the front tooth on my left side. My dentist suggested that we try to save the tooth but after an examination, he said it was too damaged and needed to be extracted.

My dentist explained that there were two options for replacing the missing teeth: implants or getting a crown. He recommended a single front tooth crown before and after because it would be easier for me during my day-to-day life than implants (I don’t want anything in my mouth). He said that the single front tooth crown would last about 10 years before needing an adjustment or replacement.

I’m very happy with how the new tooth looks!

Heath Fitness